2015 July eBulletin

In this issue of LERA's e-Bulletin: July 2015

  • Read the latest LER Law eNewsletter from Ann Hodges
  • David Weil’s book was extensively referenced in a July 12 New York Times article
  • Lu Zhang’s new Cambridge University Press book is out.
  • Lawrence Katz is quoted at length in the Atlantic
  • Tom Kochan talks about overtime pay
  • Further reading for LERA members
Details:
Ann Hodges has released the latest edition of theLER Law eNewsletter. Click on the linked eNewsletter to review this quarters "hot topics" including:
  • Keeping Fed. Contractors Compliant?
  • How Does Overtime Rule Become Law?
  • Fashion, Faith, and Workers’ Rights
  • Interns & Employment Classification
  • Free Riders & Fair Share Fees
The LER Law eNewsletter also contains an update on the NLRB, including:
  • Election Rules – Ambush or Simple?
  • Temporary Employees
  • Sun Shines on Witness Statements
David Weil’s book was extensively referenced in a July 12 New York Times article ‘Growth in the ‘Gig Economy’ Fuels Work Force Anxieties.” Weil, Department of Labor Wage and Hours Division administrator, is on leave from Boston University and Harvard, is the author of The Fissured Workplace: Why Work Became So Bad for So Many and What Can Be Done to Improve it. The article talks about Weil’s findings that the hospitality industry’s subcontracting out functions such as housekeeping, maintenance and janitorial services: “Industrywide, wages have fallen since 2000, and labor law violations are rampant.” Also quoted in the article: Arne Kalleberg, Susan Houseman.
Lu Zhang’s new Cambridge University Press book is out. We’ll review Inside China’s Automobile Factories in this fall’s Perspectives on Work. We’ll also post the review, contents and an excerpt in the Members’ Resources area on the LERA website. Zhang is an assistant professor of sociology at Temple University.
Here’s a link to information about the book on the Cambridge University Press web site:
Harvard labor economist Lawrence Katz is quoted at length in the Atlantic magazinefeature article “A World Without Work.” The author, Derek Thompson, starts in Youngstown, Ohio, a post WW II prosperous industrial city decimated economically by globalism and technology. Thompson extrapolates to the big 21st century employment question: “Is any job truly safe?” It’s a long worthwhile read.
After President Obama announced a broadening of overtime pay for salaried employees, Tom Kochan had some further suggestions. You can read them on his blog posted on the Employment Policy Research Network.
Comments, questions, suggestions to educhins@illinois.edu.

Further reading of interest:

The ‘Sharing Economy’:

International Management-Labor: